Law Enforcement And The Power Of Relationships

In the world of Law Enforcement and Public Safety, the value of relationships are powerful and important.

Why are they so important? Because relationships are the foundation for positive and successful police work. Your ability to create and maintain solid relationships with those you interact with are key.

Relationships affect the level of service you provide to the public as well as your ability to relate to victims, witnesses, suspects and criminals. Investing in these relationships will allow you to do a better job, and ultimately, be a better and more effective police officer.

These relationships take many forms.  As an officer, you are connected very closely with:  Creating Relationships Police

  • The public that you protect and serve
  • Those persons in violation of the law
  • Your partner
  • Those in your chain of command (both above and below you)
  • The business community that you interact with
  • Other public service entities (fire, EMS, social agencies, etc.)
  • Your spouse and your family

For most law enforcement officers, the relationships they create are absolutely vital. The positive payoffs are varied and unending. Your ability to connect with others may break a lead in a case, or force a confession or even get you a promotion.

Much like any other line of work, cultivating natural and healthy relationships will eventually have noticeable benefits.

  • Spending hours a day on patrol? Get to know your partner and allow them to know you.
  • Gathering information from witnesses and informants? Think about what makes them tick; what their motivations are.
  • A certain crime beat reporter is always on the scene? Buy them a cup of coffee on occasion.
  • Carrying work stress home with you? Talk to your spouse or other family members.

What makes a successful, effective and content police officer?  And how do you become one?  Hard work to be sure.  Taking advantage of unseen opportunities, yes. And likely developing strong and lasting relationships.

Networking, connecting, socializing, associating, mingling and interfacing are all ways to boost your relationships. Tell someone thank you. Recognize someone publicly. Buy a round of drinks. Powerful relationships are seeded over a long time period.

Devote a little time to building stronger relationships. It’s competitive out there – even in law enforcement where public safety takes center stage.

Have specific suggestions on how to build powerful relationships?  Share your comments below.